With the election around the corner, many Americans who haven’t already voted early will probably try to do so tomorrow. However, some students at the University of Georgia who aren’t residents of Athens may not have a chance to head back home and cast their vote. UGA student Larsen Vaughn says he won’t be able to make it back to his hometown of Macon tomorrow to vote.

“Me being able to go home on the weekends once every couple of months is slim at this point,” said Vaughn. “Going home during the week is virtually impossible.”

Vaughn stays busy with pre-med courses in college, and is also very involved in his church community. Many students lead similar busy lives. If a student missed the early voting window and lives far from Athens, he or she might struggle to get home to vote tomorrow. Students might not be able to trek hundreds of miles back home, especially not during the middle of the week.

“I wish I would’ve been a little bit more proactive in the process, and that I didn’t wait as long as I did,” said Vaughn. “At this point, I either have to vote tomorrow, or I can’t, and now I’m too busy to vote tomorrow.”

Students who live far away may not be able to go home to vote, but the UGA Board of Regents Policy Manual states that students may be exempted from class for “the interval reasonably required for voting.”

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By: Cameron Crosby

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